In a Flash. Clean ports

Container ships and cruise liners demand somewhere in the range of 3 to 16 megawatts of electricity. That is easily enough for a small town. In most of the world’s ports, the diesel engines even run when the ship is at anchor, since the crew, guests and, of course, the equipment still need electricity. This […]


Container ships and cruise liners demand somewhere in the range of 3 to 16 megawatts of electricity. That is easily enough for a small town. In most of the world’s ports, the diesel engines even run when the ship is at anchor, since the crew, guests and, of course, the equipment still need electricity. This puts a major strain on port cities, however, because the air quality suffers greatly from the exhaust fumes.


Therefore, the ports of Hamburg and Kiel (pictured) are among the first in the world that are turning to shore power supply. But it is not enough to plug the ship in and turn the diesel engine off. Ship and shore power grids use different voltages and frequencies. Therefore, frequency converters and matching transformers are necessary. Active and passive GRIDCON® harmonic filters from Reinhausen are used to ensure that there is no impermissible grid feedback into public distribution grids via the grid connection. They keep the shore grid clean, while indirectly keeping the air clean as well.


More information on the filter solutions:

www.reinhausen.com/gridcon

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